Review: Susanna Leonard Hill’s Story Cards

I am just back from a vacation in Quebec City, one of my favourite cities in the world. I had a fabulous, fun-filled five days there!
Although I was away from home, I still continued to do creative things. That included observing the clouds from the plane for a story I have in mind.

The basis of a future story

The basis of a future story

I also played dress up at the Museum of Civilization. The museum had this awesome exhibition where you could dress up as fairy tale characters. I had a blast there. I even dressed up as more characters than my daughter! As I have written before, it’s important to remember to play to continue to light your creative fire.

Do I rock this costume or what?

Do I rock this costume or what?

Before I left, I met my local critique partner, Bev, for a writing session. We tried out Susanna Leonard Hill’s “What’s the Story” cards, which I won from Susanna’s Holiday Contest. (Yes, I meant to do it earlier, since I won them around Christmas. Just think of this blog post as a celebration of Christmas in July.)… Anyway, to read my winning entry, click here.
To read a short description of the cards by Susanna, click here. It is at the end of the blog post. The basic idea is that you use words from different categories (i.e., problem, setting, goal) to write a story. You can either use a story card that gives you suggestions or you can draw your own.
I had tried the cards once with my daughter. We had done a preliminary informal session where we had used the cards to tell stories orally. That was a lot of fun.
This time with Bev we decided to write down our stories. We set a time limit of 5 minutes for each story and did three stories. Instead of jumping into each story immediately like I usually do, I decided to take Bev’s lead and brainstorm first before writing each story. I think that her way is a great way to do it.
For the first exercise, we each used a different “What’s the Story Card” to inform us what categories to use. You can check out my picture to see my card choices. I accidentally replaced cake with birthday, but no matter. And my character completely surprised me! I will tinker with this story to see if I can make it work.

My selection of story cards

My selection of story cards

For the second exercise, we each drew our own categories. This was the hardest of all three exercises for both of us.
The third exercise was the most fun. We both used the same “What’s the Story?” card with the same choices. Not surprisingly, we came up with completely different story lines! Bev came away from that exercise with a story that she wants to use! Hurrah!
So as you can see, the whole writing session was a success with both of us coming away with a workable story. So I’m giving the cards a two pens up!

What I like about these cards:
They are very flexible:
• You can use as many or as few cards as you wish.
• If you don’t like your choice you can draw another card, as Bev did one time.
• You can brainstorm first or not.
• You can set a time limit of a few minutes or no time limit at all.
• You could save a particular story to work on later, as Bev did.
However, my favourite part is the category choices, and I think that this is the strongest point of the cards.

Who could use the cards:
Well anybody really, but here are some suggestions that Bev and I came up with:
• People who want to work on a certain category that they are weak in (One of my weaknesses is themes, so this will be one I will concentrate on.)
• If you have writer’s block
• For warm up exercises
• As a confidence booster: see, you really are creative!
• Beginners who think they have no ideas
• On a day when none of your ideas appeals to you

Any drawbacks?
Well none, really. The only time I struggled was when I pulled a card from every category. I think though, had I brainstormed first, it would have been manageable.

How do you get your hands on these cards?
Click here to go to Susanna’s website to order them.

Thanks, Susanna, for your generosity and for creating such an excellent tool.

Summer 2016 Writing

It’s summer, and it’s hot! But my writing is not…
Well, that’s not completely true. I have made a breakthrough in my writing, which has actually lit a bit of a fire underneath me. I have recently realized that my writer’s block is sometimes due to the fact that I am frustrated. I get frustrated not knowing where I am going wrong and how to fix the problems in my manuscripts. Why continue to write when I seem to be doing the same things over and over, and it’s not getting me anywhere?
That’s why it’s important to continue to study the craft of writing. So I am currently taking an excellent self directed course called the Art of Arc. Alayne Kay Christian’s course goes really in depth into picture book writing, and it has allowed me to make that breakthrough I was talking about. The course comes complete with worksheets that allow you to analyze published picture books plus your own manuscripts.
Anyway, the reason that my writing is not as hot as I would like it to be is because summer is always a chaotic, unscheduled time. My daughter is off school. We go on vacation. And so on. I hope to continue my blogging every two weeks, but if not, understand it’s due to an often chaotic schedule. For example, I realize that I am one day late for today’s blog post. Oops! That’s actually because I have spent the last two days driving my dad around to various appointments. But I am planning on doing a session with my local writing partner, Bev, on Friday, which will lead to my next blog post. Bev and I will work on our writing using Susanna Leonard Hill’s “What’s the story” cards. Click here to read a short description of the cards that Susanna has added to the end of a blog post.

badge-final-4x4-brighter-heart
In the meantime, I am getting excited for this year’s Kidlit Summer School. If you haven’t already signed up, you still can until July 15. Click here for the information.
I wish you heat in your writing this summer. But keep cool in your life and in this weather.