CANSCAIP 2016 Conference

Yesterday, I attended my third CANSCAIP conference. As always, I came home inspired and full of new ideas.
I will wrap up my experience by giving you one insight I gained from each speaker.
Ashley Spires, who has written several fabulous picture books including “The Most Magnificent Thing” and “Small Saul” (our gift this year), was the first keynote speaker. She spoke on author insecurity, which she called “the not-good-enoughs”. She ended her lecture by telling us that coming to a conference like this one is like shouting in the face of the “not-good-enoughs”. I agree!

Kathy Stinson

Kathy Stinson

Kathy Stinson, best know for “Red is Best” (Canada’s “Where the Wild Things are”) and the more recent “The Man with the Violin”, talked about several challenges of writing picture books. She said that most beginnings of picture book manuscripts sounded like a lot of “throat clearing” before a speech. That is, there were many unnecessary words before the actual beginning of the story. So if you are looking for a good place to cut words, then look at your beginning first.
Helaine Becker, the hilarious and very straightforward author of many nonfiction books, gave us a lot of information in her one hour lecture on nonfiction books. She told us that when evaluating an idea, the “kiss of death” is when the information about the idea is readily found on the web.

"Breaking In" Panel

“Breaking In” Panel

My next lecture was a panel of four newly published authors (Joyce Grant, Mahak Jain, Kate Blair, and Caroline Fernandez) who shared their road to getting published. All four, who three years ago were unpublished, had very different stories. They also had loads of advice. One thing that was suggested is to go to the Ontario Library Association (OLA) SuperConference, at least to the expo. There you will find most of the kidlit publishers, as well as librarians, teachers, and book store owners. Hmmmm, I have never been, but it looks like an excellent opportunity.

Patricia Storms shows us her storyboard for "Never Let You Go"

Patricia Storms shows us her storyboard for “Never Let You Go”

My final lecture was on storyboarding with Patricia Storms, author of “Pirate and Penguin” and “Never Let You Go”. She suggested that even if you are not an illustrator, you can draw pictures along with your text when you storyboard. That way you will see what you can leave up to the illustrations and so cut out of your text.
We wrapped up the day with a final keynote from David Booth, an author and educator. He talked about how Canadian children’s books used to be and how they are today, reflecting more of actual life. He reminded us that the future of Canadian children’s books is in our hands. As he so eloquently put it, you can kill a dog in a children’s story, as long as there is a puppy later. In other words, always leave a child with hope.
Bonus: One of the comments made during the breaking in panel by a member of the audience was about the CSARN mentorship. Check it out. It’s free!
What new and/or inspiring writing information have you learned recently? Feel free to share in the comments.

Bringing History to Life

On Sunday, I attended a fabulous talk by Mary-Eileen McClear, a storyteller for more than 30 years, called “Bringing History to Life”.

These are three of the many things that we talked about:

1. You have to know what your story is about. Try diluting it into six words.
I had heard about writing what your story is about in one sentence to maintain focus, but never in six words. This was a fun exercise, and one I will revisit. For some inspiration, go to the six word stories website.

You can also watch this video done by Larry Smith about how six words are often the way in.

2. Story ideas are everywhere.
To prove her point McClear randomly handed out articles she had saved. It was fascinating to hear what stories and connections people came up with based on the article they received. My subject was one that I am going to research more to see if I can turn her story into a children’s story.

That very day I started to read Jane Urquhart’s book called “A Number of Things: Stories About Canada Told Through 50 Objects”, in which she talks about Canada’s history as seen through 50 objects. The author suggests we find 50 different objects and make another version of Canada’s history. I think this is a valuable exercise. Perhaps you do not want to do it about a country’s history, but instead your local history or even your own family history. Who knows what stories there are just begging to be told? Perhaps it is an exercise that is valuable to revisit at the next PiBoMoId in January.

3. Find your way into a story by first discovering why you were intrigued.
You need to connect to your story first so that you will be able to help your reader connect to it. So what intrigued you about the story in the first place? And what emotions did the story bring up? Your readers also need some sort of emotion to connect with.

The afternoon was a fun filled one, and I definitely want to participate in future storytelling seminars.

For now though I have a lot of ideas to work with. One suggestion was to listen to storytellers like Syd Lieberman. Listen to the story called “The Johnstown Flood of 1889” for an exceptional example of making a story come alive through senses. Enjoy!