Alzheimer’s and Dementia Picture Books

This week’s post is a little late, because the day before yesterday was the day we put my father in a senior citizen’s home. It was a heartbreaking decision, but he could no longer be safe at home.

Because of this, I am not getting much writing accomplished this week. But one thing I am doing is keeping up with the ReFoReMo posts. So far my favourite post is this one by Tammi Sauer about structure. It gave me some ideas about a “how to” manuscript I have been working on. If you have not signed up, it’s too late to register for prizes but not too late to follow the blog posts.

I am also doing some picture book research for a personal project that I am working on. My dad has Alzheimer’s, and it is rapidly progressing, which is the reason we had to put him in a home. So I decided that I would use the time during ReFoReMo to study how Alzheimer’s and dementia is explained via picture books. I want to find out if and how I can tell my father’s story and more specifically my 8-year-old daughter’s experience of her grandpa with Alzheimer’s.

There are two books that I read that I want to recommend. The first one is called “Grandma” by Jessica Shepherd. I like this book, because it concentrates on the transition of the grandma to the senior citizen’s home and what life is like for her there. I think that’s an important topic that needs to be written about more. In many books, it is just touched upon.

My husband and I were the ones who dropped my father off the day before yesterday, so my daughter has yet to see his new place. But already she was asking questions, questions that I know came from reading “Grandma”. Can we have a tour when we get there? Who lives next to him? How big is his room? I appreciate that the book is helping her understand the transition.

I also liked that “Grandma” talked about the anger that many seniors with dementia have including my dad. There is also a back matter section if the parent wants to go into more detail with the child. The book won the Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Gold Seal Best Book Award.

Recently my daughter brought back “Mile-High Apple Pie” by Laura Langston and Lindsey Gardiner from her school library. Now this is an older book, but it won several accolades including being nominated for the Blue Spruce award, and it is still very relevant today.

I liked this book for several reasons. One is that it is set in the present time from the beginning. Many other picture books I read did a lot of reminiscing–some for far too long. The fact that it is set in the present immediately drew me into the story. Perhaps that is because I am living it. Another thing is that the grandma lives with the family, which is the situation we were in. My dad lived with us. I know that’s an unusual arrangement, so most books show the grandparent living in their own house. Therefore, “Mile-High Apple Pie” shows the necessity of having respite care from the situation. (Our recent respite care was our trip to China.)

My daughter noted that the child cried in this book. That was a complaint she had about other books. “Why does nobody ever cry,” she asked me. It is a heartbreaking situation, and there are certainly going to be tears.

Certainly these picture books are more reflective of our experience of Alzheimer’s. If you have others that you would like to recommend, please leave a comment for me.

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2 thoughts on “Alzheimer’s and Dementia Picture Books

  1. So sorry Linda – what a most difficult week for all of you. You have to know it is the best for him – but gut wrenching decision to have had to make.
    Wonderful post. I’ll have to check those books out. One book I used in school was one by Mem Fox – Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge – a lovely book.

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