Bringing History to Life

On Sunday, I attended a fabulous talk by Mary-Eileen McClear, a storyteller for more than 30 years, called “Bringing History to Life”.

These are three of the many things that we talked about:

1. You have to know what your story is about. Try diluting it into six words.
I had heard about writing what your story is about in one sentence to maintain focus, but never in six words. This was a fun exercise, and one I will revisit. For some inspiration, go to the six word stories website.

You can also watch this video done by Larry Smith about how six words are often the way in.

2. Story ideas are everywhere.
To prove her point McClear randomly handed out articles she had saved. It was fascinating to hear what stories and connections people came up with based on the article they received. My subject was one that I am going to research more to see if I can turn her story into a children’s story.

That very day I started to read Jane Urquhart’s book called “A Number of Things: Stories About Canada Told Through 50 Objects”, in which she talks about Canada’s history as seen through 50 objects. The author suggests we find 50 different objects and make another version of Canada’s history. I think this is a valuable exercise. Perhaps you do not want to do it about a country’s history, but instead your local history or even your own family history. Who knows what stories there are just begging to be told? Perhaps it is an exercise that is valuable to revisit at the next PiBoMoId in January.

3. Find your way into a story by first discovering why you were intrigued.
You need to connect to your story first so that you will be able to help your reader connect to it. So what intrigued you about the story in the first place? And what emotions did the story bring up? Your readers also need some sort of emotion to connect with.

The afternoon was a fun filled one, and I definitely want to participate in future storytelling seminars.

For now though I have a lot of ideas to work with. One suggestion was to listen to storytellers like Syd Lieberman. Listen to the story called “The Johnstown Flood of 1889” for an exceptional example of making a story come alive through senses. Enjoy!

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