“Meet the Publishers” Talk at the “Telling Tales” Festival

I have always wanted to go to the Telling Tales Festival, but something has always come up. However, when I heard that there would be a publisher’s panel there, I knew I had to clear my schedule and make it a priority to attend.
I wasn’t able to arrive until around 2:00, but that still allowed me to experience enough to make me want to go back.

Great crowd!

Great crowd!

The crowds were large as you can see here at Kevin Sylvester’s lecture. I attended the second half and learned a thing or two, such if you want to be an artist, make sure you study math. Why’s that? Many pictures are based on mathematical principles.

Bill Slavin ready to talk

Bill Slavin ready to talk

After his lecture, I had a little bit of time to attend the first half of Bill Slavin’s presentation. It was his first time there, but he said he definitely wanted to come back. I observed his presentation through the eyes of an author. One thing I noticed is that he had plenty of audience participation, which kept the audience engaged.
Another thing I noticed is what a great read aloud book he had just had published. “Who Broke the Teapot?” had the members of the audience–and not only the children–yelling out the repetitive line, which is, you may have guessed, “Who Broke the Teapot?” With a mystery in it, and a total twist to the ending, this book makes a great mentor text. I highly recommend it for children ages 4-7. Well actually children of all ages.
I headed on over to the publisher’s panel next. You may be wondering if it’s worth your while to attend these panels after you’ve been to several. Doesn’t the information get repetitive? Aren’t the questions and answers the same? But my take is that you will always come out with several golden nuggets that you will not get elsewhere. These publisher panels are great places to do research on publishers, and you often will find out information during them that are not to be found elsewhere.
For example, publisher Sheila Barry of Groundwood Books admitted that on their website it states they don’t accept picture book manuscripts. However, even though it states that, if you send them a picture book manuscript, they will read it. They read everything. Groundwood Books accepts unsolicited manuscripts by the way. For submission guidelines click here. But do your research to make sure that it is the right fit for your book.

Meet the Publishers

Meet the Publishers

Vikki Vansickle , author of “If I Had a Gryphon” and marketing and publicity manager at Penguin Random House Canada moderated the discussion, and the third panelist was Denise Anderson, marketing and publicity manager at Scholastic Canada. Denise Anderson did say 99% of the published manuscripts at Scholastic Canada were agented. Hmmm, I wonder about the other 1%.
Next year I hope that I can arrange my time so that I can arrive earlier. I would have loved to have seen talks by Ruth Ohi, Barbara Reid, and Helene Boudreau. And if there is another publisher’s panel, so much the better.

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